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Bad habits and tips?

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #874
    caradoc
    Participant

    I just spent a couple of hours at the park with my new D80, and I found myself changing settings by accident because I’m so used to manually advancing film after every shot – the command wheel on the D80 is exactly where I used to hit the film advance lever on my old film hardware.

    As I get used to digital, are there any other “gotchas” I should be watching for?

    Spring is coming

    (Oh, and what’s the easiest way to build Flickr links for posting here?)

    #8485
    Elsinore
    Keymaster

    My two gotchas were (and sometimes still are) white balance and iso settings. If I set white balance on anything but auto, I tend to forget to switch it back to auto or something else when I move into different light (e.g. set it on tungsten/incandescent for indoors, then go shoot outdoors and forget to set it on cloudy or sunny results in jpgs that have a not-so-lovely blue cast). This isn’t so much a problem for RAW, since you can pick the white balance after-the-fact, but it’s difficult to fix jpgs shot like that. I tend to just shoot on auto WB these days and adjust after the fact, though that isn’t particuarly ideal (just the easiest/laziest way to deal with it 😉 ) because auto WB can slightly shift white balance from frame to frame. That means you might not get consistent WB if you rely on auto WB, though I don’t have too much trouble with it.

    With ISO, there have been plenty of times where I was shooting indoors in dim lighting, so I bumped up my ISO to 800 or 1600 (or 3200 even), then promptly forgot about it. Then my next session was shot in great light that didn’t need anything near 800+ on ISO, but I forgot and ended up with shots that were much granier/noisier than they needed to be because I shot them at much higher ISO than needed. This is partly Canon’s fault for not having current ISO speed listed constantly in their viewfinder display (it displays in the viewfinder only when changing it, though it does display on the LCD panel). I deal with this one usually by just forcing myself to re-set the ISO down to 100 or 200 after shooting at high ISO. I think Nikon displays it in the viewfinder, though, so you might not have that issue.

    As for Flickr links on this board, I do pretty much what you did above–separate link above the picture–I think it complies with the spirit and letter of the TOS since you are providing a link back to your Flickr page. Very nice shot, btw! Love that composition and DOF 🙂

    #8486
    bb
    Participant

    ugh… I accidentally forget to change the ISO back on my Cannon 30D after shooting in low light way too frequently. I’m trying to train myself to be more aware of it, but it sucks in the mean time to step out into daylight and take 40 pics only to realize they are all at ISO 1600. I did it more than a few times during my trip in Ethiopia when visting dark churches.

    #8487
    Boston_Matt
    Participant

    I have to got thru all my setting prior to each outing… I have been burned too by being set to ISO 1600/3200 in bright sunlight and ruining what would have been great pictures. I also ALWAYS shoot in RAW, that way you have a lot more latitude in correcting color balance issues in post.

    Learn your viewfinder display and make a habit before snapping a shot to look at your shutter speed. This will also be a tell tale if you are set to too high an ISO (low ISO is a dead giveaway click……..click 🙂

    #8488
    Claff
    Participant

    My big ‘gatcha’ is, after going to manual focus for a tricky shot, forgetting to switch back to autofocus and until this dawns on me I shoot a lot of junk. Now, when I park my cameras for the night I switch them to manual focus just so I get in the habit of checking that particular setting every time I pick the thing up.

    #8489
    QuickSilver
    Participant

    The transition from filmstock to digital images caused me multiple problems because of my good habits with film so to speak. Firstly is the habit of only shooting 1 ISO setting for 24 or 36 shots, whereas with the digital cameras you may change ISO settings for every shot. It is for this very reason that it became such a problem for me to even remember that I had the option available. As the infomercial says, “Set It and Forget it”, that is the method I used for far too many years, well several anyway. The second problem is failing to get the shot that would be the the shot of the shoot, (that sounds awkward), because of the miserly habits learned with film to save exposures incase something that would really make a good picture happens.

    #8490
    Curious
    Participant

    because of the miserly habits learned with film to save exposures incase something that would really make a good picture happens.

    years ago when i expressed an interest in photography our staff photog loaned me a pentax, gave me two rolls of film then sent the film to meisel (along with some company stuff) for processing. total cost to me – nada. he also taught me that film is cheap compared to all the other costs associated with commercial catalog shooting. i have never looked back since.

    and digital just takes that to a whole new level.

    #8491
    QuickSilver
    Participant

    he also taught me that film is cheap compared to all the other costs associated with commercial catalog shooting. i have never looked back since.

    and digital just takes that to a whole new level.

    It does indeed ❗ Perhaps if I was ever shooting in the commercial end of the spectrum I would have considered film cheap as well. When I first started taking pictures, I would take the exposed film to the local pharmacy for processing and always was amazed that they were willing to give me a free roll of film for each roll I submitted for processing. Low did I realize that the real profit was int he processing fees collected. With that in mind film was cheap, it was the processing that I found myself so short of funds to afford.

    That is why I love digital so much and only wish that I had done it years ago.

    #8492
    Elsinore
    Keymaster

    When I first started taking pictures, I would take the exposed film to the local pharmacy for processing and always was amazed that they were willing to give me a free roll of film for each roll I submitted for processing. Low did I realize that the real profit was int he processing fees collected. With that in mind film was cheap, it was the processing that I found myself so short of funds to afford.

    ya know, I’ve heard stories about getting a free roll when you dropped off one to be processed. Of course, they stopped that long before I was around, but still, I wouldn’t mind getting a free roll to keep shooting 😉

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