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Developing old film

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  • #1058
    stupido
    Participant

    While cleaning out an old desk at my mother’s place, I found 5 rolls of 35mm Kodacolor II ASA 100 film and a roll of 35mm Ektachrome.

    I do not know the age. It could me mine from high school or my mom’s from farther back. Unfortunately, I can not ask her now.

    So what’s the best way of going about getting them developed? One hour photo, specialized lab or trash can?

    Thanks
    Stupido

    #12643
    Klahanie
    Participant

    I would definitely have them developed (I would be too curious and too excited!), but would probably pass on the one hour places. Let us know what you come up with. 🙂

    #12644
    sleeping
    Participant

    I believe there are a couple labs that specialize in old film. This is the only one I know of offhand, though, and they are both slow and expensive:

    http://www.rockymountainfilm.com/

    #12645
    Curious
    Participant

    IIRC the chemistry has changed over the years so a place that either specializes in old film or a local lab that will hand develop the film in the proper chemistry would be essential.

    again IIRC some chrome from 30+ years ago had to be flashed to light as part of the development process. i remember having to do that for the 4 x 5 film i was using. it was kodak but i don’t remember just which flavor.

    #12646
    stupido
    Participant

    It’s actually C-41 process for the Kodacolor II, just old film. Rocky Mountain seems a bit slow and pricey. Would be a bummer if it was my old attempts at photography and I pay $30 per roll of badly exposed film. I hate to trust this to a 1 hour place, perhaps I should try Murphy’s Camera here in Lexington.

    #12647
    stupido
    Participant

    Just an update for the C-41 film. Talked to a few people and did research etc. Least according to a trusted photographer I know, she states it didn’t really matter where it was developed, just as long as the chemicals, machine etc was up to snuff. Now the hard part would be the printing. Most people end up printing them in BW. I also read that if you pushed the film a stop, it could help the contrast. Unfortunately, the last local lab that did that closed.

    Any we tried 1 roll and NOTHING. Mostly likely it was never exposed. Either it got rewound by accident, missloaded or the shutter was broken.

    Also apparently, Ektachrome does not load the image for long. I was told it was not worth my while to bother. But I sent it off for standard processing anyway.

    I will try the other rolls later just incase. One question is I could try just developing them as bw to start with. C-41 will develop in standard chemicals. That would eliminate the bleach process step.

    #12648
    serjohn
    Participant

    Hopefully the place you sent the Ektachrome knows what they are doing since it it’s older then the mid 70’s (?) it would be an E4 process not E6 which is what current slide film uses, except Kodachrome which uses (soon to be used 🙁 ) K-14. HTH

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