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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 22 total)
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  • #1051
    QuickSilver
    Participant

    I have seen suggestions that say a good way to do macro photography on the cheap is to connect 2 lenses together face to face with a connecting ring. How available are such rings and what are they really called? I can’t seem to find anything called a connecting ring.

    I also wonder, if that set up works for macro can you get crazy telephoto if placing 2 wide angle lenses together face to face?

    #12575
    sleeping
    Participant

    They’re called macro couplers, or reverse couplers. This is different from a reversing ring (those are designed for mounting a lens backwards directly on a camera or bellows). You can also use tape if you can find a couple lenses that are a pretty good fit.

    You’re shortening the focal length doing this, not increasing it (no telephoto effects). Also, you don’t want to use a wide angle as the lens on the camera, you want a tele (narrow field of view) to avoid vignetting from the lens you’re sticking on the front. You might be able to use a wide as the reversed lens, but that will give you a very high magnification and very small working distance. Magnification is approximately equal to the focal length of the main lens/ fl of the reversed lens

    Here’s a couple of examples:

    http://flickr.com/photos/awrose/719214119/

    Curves

    #12576
    staplermofo
    Participant

    I tried it once. You either need the steadiest hands in the world and the light of 10,000 suns or the world’s greatest tripod and the patience of someone famous for being patient whose mention here would be witty.

    It works, but man, soooo hard.
    You might want to consider a lens reverser and a cheap, used 50mm full manual lens. Having the most sensitive to damage part of your lens inches from what you’re shooting is really nerve wracking, what with the weight of two lenses, and the constant frobbing of every knob on your tripod to get the 1/100″ closer so you can even make out what you’re trying to shoot.

    #12577
    QuickSilver
    Participant

    You might want to consider a lens reverser and a cheap, used 50mm full manual lens. Having the most sensitive to damage part of your lens inches from what you’re shooting is really nerve wracking, what with the weight of two lenses, and the constant frobbing of every knob on your tripod to get the 1/100″ closer so you can even make out what you’re trying to shoot.

    Thanks for the info folks. On second thought that is a very scary proposition with my very expensive glass in the first place. (countdown unintentional) Sometimes it is better to leave well enough alone.

    #12578
    Curious
    Participant

    QuickSilver while these extension tubes aren’t cheap they are half the cost of a dedicated macro lens. they work in a similar fashion to a bellows but of course lack the variability.

    BTW the extension tube link goes to ones for my camera, they are made in several different mounts.

    and what staplermofo said about the tripod and general difficulty applies to any true macro shots. the DOF is really shallow and focus(ing) is a pain.

    #12579
    QuickSilver
    Participant

    what staplermofo said about the tripod and general difficulty applies to any true macro shots. the DOF is really shallow and focus(ing) is a pain.

    I know about the depth of field problems for sure it took me about 10 shots to get the one of the key on the Treasury seal. 🙂

    #12580
    sleeping
    Participant

    I tried it once. You either need the steadiest hands in the world and the light of 10,000 suns or the world’s greatest tripod and the patience of someone famous for being patient whose mention here would be witty.

    Or a flash 😉 The daddy longlegs shot above was handheld at f/22 or so with a flash. I couldn’t use a tripod because the plant was blowing around so much. I did take several shots and only that one came out though.

    Another thing that makes high magnification macros a lot easier is a focusing rail. This lets you move the camera forwards and back to focus instead of trying to adjust a tripod which isn’t really designed for very fine adjustments.

    #12581
    Analogy
    Participant

    A desk lamp with a 100W bulb a couple inches from your subject gets you a very nice shutter speed. Not recommended for objects with a low melting point. Metal should be allowed to cool before handling it. I am not responsible for third-degree burns, etc.

    #12582
    Curious
    Participant

    Another thing that makes high magnification macros a lot easier is a focusing rail. This lets you move the camera forwards and back to focus instead of trying to adjust a tripod which isn’t really designed for very fine adjustments.

    see my “bellows” link above. the problem i have with the focusing rail is not being able to get close and have adjustment room left. see frame #007. while the setup looks ok in frame #026 the lens front is actually pretty far back. granted i haven’t used that bellows in several years and had better success when it was being used more.

    #12583
    sleeping
    Participant

    see my “bellows” link above. the problem i have with the focusing rail is not being able to get close and have adjustment room left. see frame #007. while the setup looks ok in frame #026 the lens front is actually pretty far back. granted i haven’t used that bellows in several years and had better success when it was being used more.

    I have a very similar, if not identical, bellows, but a non-matching vivitar rail. You’re right – it would be much easier to use if you could move the back standard as well as the front (an Auto Bellows 3 would be nice….)

    #12584
    Curious
    Participant

    (an Auto Bellows 3 would be nice….)

    the understatement of the week year.

    #12585
    XenPix
    Participant

    I just purchased the extension tube set (after Millera9 mentioned them) and they are really great, particularly for the small amount of money you pay for them.

    I would offer examples, but I haven’t uploaded them yet. Will try to put some up tonight to demonstrate the difference, unless someone else chimes in with some. 🙂

    #12586
    XenPix
    Participant

    Ok, so I’m a day late here..

    This is without extension tubes as close as I could get.

    this is with extension tubes (I went for all three, I’m greedy like that) pretty much as close as I could get.

    #12587
    millera9
    Participant

    Very cool XenPix, I’m glad you’re enjoying them. After using mine for a few months, I’ve learned not to put all three on at once unless I’m looking to take a picture of something that’s holding very still. I usually put the 36mm one on with my 70-200 and it does an admirable job and can still be handheld in direct sunlight. Otherwise, break the tripod out!

    Good luck and have fun!

    #12588
    XenPix
    Participant

    Yeah, I did find it was quite hefty and didn’t like anything that moved (it was a tad windy and that damn alium was flying all over the place!) but I wanted to see how close it would go, now I’ve done that, I’ll probably fiddle around with each one and then try combinations of two before finally sticking to one that works for me.

    Plus, I have the 10-22mm to play with as well, so they might stay back in the box for a little while. 😀

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