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Pass the Farkolga

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 55 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #25047
    nobigdeal
    Participant

    The film talk got me wondering where this thing is right now.

    #25046
    Kestrana
    Participant

    At my house still. I never got it out to thepostess but she has disappeared now.

    #25087
    SilverStag
    Participant

    I’ll jump in and take a turn if no one else steps up.

    #25086
    Kestrana
    Participant

    Sure we can get it out to you this week.

    #25045
    Farktographer
    Participant

    I’d also love to have a go at this one, once you’re done with it SilverStag. My gf just got a couple film cameras and a lot of film to play with, but she’s hoarding it all for herself for now, so I’d love to give a Holga a try 😆

    #25044
    Kestrana
    Participant

    Can you PM or FB me the address you want it sent to SilverStag?

    #25043
    SilverStag
    Participant

    I got it today! My god these things really are cheap!

    Any tips from those who’ve already used it?

    #25042
    Kestrana
    Participant

    These are the pictures I took from it. They’re not exactly, uh, spectacular but there you have it: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kestrana/sets/72157625714127657/
    I think looking for things with a lot of contrast helps but that’s about all I can offer.

    #25041
    orionid
    Participant

    Make sure the selector window on the back matches the frame inside. The smaller frame is 16 4×6 shots, the bigger frame is 12 6×6 shots. 400 iso works great in overcast, 200 or 100 in full light. Neither one works indoors. I threw the 800 in there for fun, it’ll probably be fine indoors during daytime.

    You can also force-fit 35mm in it and take it to walgreens/cvs/rite aid etc to get developed, but you have to do a couple small (non-permanent) things first.
    1) Cover the red window, unless you want half your photo to be blown out with red. Use aluminum ducting tape, gaffers tape, or some other light-tight tape. Or a piece of cardboard and duct tape.
    2) Put the 35mm cartridge in the supply side, then use styrofoam peanuts to keep it snug. Tape the film leader to the take-up spool.
    3) Wind it about 18 clicks per frame. I’m guessing by the spacing on my negatives, every three shots or so, you can take two clicks out of the figure.
    4) Unload it only in a dark bag or closet/bathroom with the door sealed off from light leaks, and hand-roll the film back into the cartridge.
    5) MOST IMPORTANT – Make sure your developer knows that the negatives are not standard size, and that you will cut and scan them yourself. Lest you wind up with some pimply-faced teenager just using the pre-marked frame for standard 35mm spacing.

    Here’s some of my shots with it.

    #25040
    orionid
    Participant

    Oh, and have fun!

    #25039
    Curious
    Participant

    These are the pictures I took from it. They’re not exactly, uh, spectacular but there you have it: http://www.flickr.com/photos/kestrana/sets/72157625714127657/
    I think looking for things with a lot of contrast helps but that’s about all I can offer.

    there is a really green cast to some of those. what’s up with that?

    #25038
    Kestrana
    Participant

    The emulsion from our developer. I developed this roll myself and they come out with a purple color cast that was converted to green in the negative scan. In most black and white photos I’ve scanned, I’ve corrected it in post processing but I left it in the Holga pictures because I found it interesting.

    #25037
    Kestrana
    Participant

    I think roll might have stuck to itself at one point in the film canister too. I know there was one roll of my film that had problems but I thought that was in the Voigtlander.

    #25085
    Farktographer
    Participant

    Make sure the selector window on the back matches the frame inside. The smaller frame is 16 4×6 shots, the bigger frame is 12 6×6 shots. 400 iso works great in overcast, 200 or 100 in full light. Neither one works indoors. I threw the 800 in there for fun, it’ll probably be fine indoors during daytime.

    You can also force-fit 35mm in it and take it to walgreens/cvs/rite aid etc to get developed, but you have to do a couple small (non-permanent) things first.
    1) Cover the red window, unless you want half your photo to be blown out with red. Use aluminum ducting tape, gaffers tape, or some other light-tight tape. Or a piece of cardboard and duct tape.
    2) Put the 35mm cartridge in the supply side, then use styrofoam peanuts to keep it snug. Tape the film leader to the take-up spool.
    3) Wind it about 18 clicks per frame. I’m guessing by the spacing on my negatives, every three shots or so, you can take two clicks out of the figure.
    4) Unload it only in a dark bag or closet/bathroom with the door sealed off from light leaks, and hand-roll the film back into the cartridge.
    5) MOST IMPORTANT – Make sure your developer knows that the negatives are not standard size, and that you will cut and scan them yourself. Lest you wind up with some pimply-faced teenager just using the pre-marked frame for standard 35mm spacing.

    Here’s some of my shots with it.

    Noob question – do you need a special scanner for this, or can you use any run-of-the-mill scanner if it has a high enough resolution?

    #25084
    orionid
    Participant

    Make sure the selector window on the back matches the frame inside. The smaller frame is 16 4×6 shots, the bigger frame is 12 6×6 shots. 400 iso works great in overcast, 200 or 100 in full light. Neither one works indoors. I threw the 800 in there for fun, it’ll probably be fine indoors during daytime.

    You can also force-fit 35mm in it and take it to walgreens/cvs/rite aid etc to get developed, but you have to do a couple small (non-permanent) things first.
    1) Cover the red window, unless you want half your photo to be blown out with red. Use aluminum ducting tape, gaffers tape, or some other light-tight tape. Or a piece of cardboard and duct tape.
    2) Put the 35mm cartridge in the supply side, then use styrofoam peanuts to keep it snug. Tape the film leader to the take-up spool.
    3) Wind it about 18 clicks per frame. I’m guessing by the spacing on my negatives, every three shots or so, you can take two clicks out of the figure.
    4) Unload it only in a dark bag or closet/bathroom with the door sealed off from light leaks, and hand-roll the film back into the cartridge.
    5) MOST IMPORTANT – Make sure your developer knows that the negatives are not standard size, and that you will cut and scan them yourself. Lest you wind up with some pimply-faced teenager just using the pre-marked frame for standard 35mm spacing.

    Here’s some of my shots with it.

    Noob question – do you need a special scanner for this, or can you use any run-of-the-mill scanner if it has a high enough resolution?

    Both. Any scanner with a film function will work. Basically, the driver turns off the light under the glass and turns on a light above the film to get a shoot-through effect. I have heard (although not tested side by side) that a dedicated film scanner gives better results than a dual purpose flatbed, but I’ve found no problems using an epson perfection 2580 or V500.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 55 total)
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