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If it wasn’t in HD, I’d swear he were Orionid

Forums Forums Farktography General Chat Farktography Pub and Grill If it wasn’t in HD, I’d swear he were Orionid

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
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  • #2428
    ravnostic
    Participant
    #41547
    lokisbong
    Participant

    damn that was pretty cool.

    #41548
    orionid
    Participant

    A Q? A Farking Q?!?! Jesus!

    /Someday.

    Some background for the non-rocketeers. Amateur and model rocket engines are designated by letter codes as to how powerful they are, each letter being twice as powerful as the one before it. One B = 2 A’s, 1 C = 2 B’s or 4 A’s, etc. The ones you get at the toy store fly on 1/2 A’s through C’s and sometimes D’s. Up to D is considered “model” rocketry. E, F and G are considered “mid-power” rocketry, and in the right rocket can put you over a mile in altitude. Anyone can fly up to a G as long as you meet all the other wickets (FAA flight ceiling waiver, etc). H and I require a Level One certification from the National Association of Rocketry (my next step). By this power level, most rockets are fiberglass or carbon fiber and have onboard avionics for flight event control and tracking. J and K require level two (as well as MUST have active avionics), and L, M, and N require level three. These are the largest you’ll see commercially. To go beyond this requires a federal license to manufacture your own fuel and engines. At this power level, it’s also almost certain that you have to use welded aluminum for construction (whereas metal is illegal at the low powers). This guy was flying on a Q. That’s like eight N motors, or 2^16 (just over 65,000) wal-mart motors.

    //Jesus.

    ///Someday.

    #41549
    ravnostic
    Participant

    A Q? A Farking Q?!?! Jesus!

    /Someday.

    Some background for the non-rocketeers. Amateur and model rocket engines are designated by letter codes as to how powerful they are, each letter being twice as powerful as the one before it. One B = 2 A’s, 1 C = 2 B’s or 4 A’s, etc. The ones you get at the toy store fly on 1/2 A’s through C’s and sometimes D’s. Up to D is considered “model” rocketry. E, F and G are considered “mid-power” rocketry, and in the right rocket can put you over a mile in altitude. Anyone can fly up to a G as long as you meet all the other wickets (FAA flight ceiling waiver, etc). H and I require a Level One certification from the National Association of Rocketry (my next step). By this power level, most rockets are fiberglass or carbon fiber and have onboard avionics for flight event control and tracking. J and K require level two (as well as MUST have active avionics), and L, M, and N require level three. These are the largest you’ll see commercially. To go beyond this requires a federal license to manufacture your own fuel and engines. At this power level, it’s also almost certain that you have to use welded aluminum for construction (whereas metal is illegal at the low powers). This guy was flying on a Q. That’s like eight N motors, or 2^16 (just over 65,000) wal-mart motors.

    //Jesus.

    ///Someday.

    So….I take it you like? ;o)

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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