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Which is better overall

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 21 total)
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  • #1638
    clouddancer
    Participant

    I’m okay with the camera we have, though I do want to upgrade at some point. In doing this past shoot though, my hubby (again) proclaimed that the camera sucks. I’m asking for an overall of which do you prefer.

    Would it be better to get a more expensive point-and-shoot with settings and lenses built in, OR, would it be better to get a setup with my own lenses to put on.

    I’d learn to use the lenses in the second scenario because I’ve never actually had my own to play with. My dad has a 35-mm Minolta with a couple of lenses, but that’s about all I’ve ever used, and that was for only a couple of shots. I know each has its pros and cons. I will need something better eventually. I have a tendency to stick with what I know and not grow, but I’m willing to learn. Hubby says that I’d be better off with the lenses. Says he used to have a camera with stuff until it got stolen, wishes he still had it. Obviously, going for the lenses would in the end cost more, but that’s okay because it would (I think) allow for more control on my end to get better shots.

    Also, which brands have you had the most success with? I’m considering for the next camera not staying with Kodak and going with another brand because Kodak, at least online, does not seem to have a lot of options any more.

    Thanks in advance for the advice.

    #23264
    nobigdeal
    Participant

    Canon Rebel XS or Nikon D40 are the best place to start in the DSLR market. Both are cheap (under $600.00)and come with decent lenses in the kit. You can build your lens collection from that starting point.

    A good P&S is ok but to get a really decent one you are going to spend almost as much. So why not start out with the real thing?

    #23265
    olavf
    Participant

    I’ll second that. Either one of those will do nicely. The other thing I’ll suggest is to go to a store that sells them and pick them up and see how they feel to you. push the buttons, play with the controls, etc.

    Figure that once you start down one path or another, you probably won’t want to switch once you’ve bought a couple of lenses…

    #23266
    lokisbong
    Participant

    I will add my two cents by saying that I absolutely love my Canon Rebel XS. It is a huge improvement over my point and shoot and that’s a Canon also. I can’t wait to get more than the kit lens that came with the Rebel XS. Getting to pick up and handle the choices would be the best bet for sure.

    #23267
    clouddancer
    Participant

    Looks like it’s saving up for the Canon Rebel XS. That happens (also) to be the camera that hubby picked. Since I’m picky or want my options, I’ll make sure to have enough for an extra lens or 2 and at least a decent camera bag for this as well. There’s a great deal on Newegg for it, but we have zero money for it, and no credit cards so that’s out. Guess I should not have gone looking. Seems like Canon also has a big variety of lenses that this camera could take too, which is also another great feature. It means I’ll have some variety for learning.

    Who knows, maybe if I put it on my Christmas list and ask extra nice and behave well, Santa will bring it to me (yeah right).

    #23268
    Uranus
    Participant

    Canon Rebel XS or Nikon D40 are the best place to start in the DSLR market. Both are cheap (under $600.00)and come with decent lenses in the kit. You can build your lens collection from that starting point.

    A good P&S is ok but to get a really decent one you are going to spend almost as much. So why not start out with the real thing?

    just picked up a d60 body [?320.-] in addition to the d40, seeing as the d40 is no longer available here. all the simplicity and robust goodness of the d40, but with a built-in sensor cleaning function…love it.

    the canon crew swear by the Rebel, and from friends who have one – i’d honestly be stuck between them if i were a first-time buyer.

    and as NBD says – a top end P&S will cost as much. P&S is generally more forgiving, but a DSLR will grow with you….

    #23269
    clouddancer
    Participant

    Looks like to lenses it is. I saw that Canon has a lot of lenses that seem to fit the Rebel XS. I haven’t looked at Nikon yet, but I will. Are they likely to carry that same line of lenses or not change the fittings, etc? The description said fits any EF or EF-S lens, would that likely be the case in a later model? I guess I’m asking if it’s stable. We probably won’t get it this year (too strapped for cash), but I do plan on stashing some money away to buy one. I’ve promised some proof of my stick-to-it-iveness for hubby in working with what we have to prove that I will do right by it and it won’t be a short lived hobby. Being that we’ll have to save for this, I think that’s only fair. He says that Canon is overall a higher quality brand (can anyone provide examples or reviews to say so?).

    I will check out the Nikon brand though and see how that compares.

    #23270
    sleeping
    Participant

    In the compact camera market, Canon seems to do a lot better overall than Nikon, but things are a bit different when you start looking at DSLRs.

    Nikon and Canon are the two biggest companies in that market (but there are others – Pentax, Sony, Olympus etc), and most professionals use one or the other. There’s a large range of lenses and accessories available for each system, but they aren’t generally intercompatible.

    The perceived advantage between them tends to swing back and forth depending on where they are in their release cycle (whichever one currently has the cool new toys, basically), but I don’t think there’s a lot in it overall. They do tend to have somewhat different ergonomics, though. I had a strong preference for Nikons when I handled them side by side, and I’ve heard other people who had exactly the opposite reaction.

    #23271
    orionid
    Participant

    On the Nikon side of the house, the D40 and D60 will only work with AF-S lenses (in auto focus, you can still manual focus the AF, G or D lenses fine). If you come across an old(er) AF, G or D lens on the cheap, it will auto focus with a D50 (out of production, can be found cheap in some online sources) or with a D90 ($$$).

    There’s also the D5000, which I haven’t used or spoken with anyone who has, but appears to be a D90 sensor and processor in the smaller body/frame, which means it also will be manual only on non AF-S lenses. But it’s $250 cheaper than the 90.

    Nuts and bolts:
    AF-S and AF-I lenses have a motor inside them. Tradeoffs: heavier, quieter, costlier, cheaper camera bodies
    AF, D, and G lenses have a screw-type autofocus and require the camera body to have a motor. Ergo, exact opposite of above.

    Some nikons support both types (D50, 90, and most higher-end ones) but tend to cost more and have a larger, heavier frame
    The cheaper/smaller nikons do not have the internal motor (D40, 60, etc) but use their size/weight as a selling point, and come with the recomendation of only using the AF-S lenses.

    /Biased
    //I heart my nikons
    ///careful, it becomes a cult, then you start to look at canon users in a distrusting manner.
    ////Besides, it’s not like U-Man or Elsinore ever took any decent photos with their canons
    ///// ;-P~ Slashies!

    #23272
    olavf
    Participant

    In the compact camera market, Canon seems to do a lot better overall than Nikon, but things are a bit different when you start looking at DSLRs.

    Nikon and Canon are the two biggest companies in that market (but there are others – Pentax, Sony, Olympus etc), and most professionals use one or the other. There’s a large range of lenses and accessories available for each system, but they aren’t generally intercompatible.

    The perceived advantage between them tends to swing back and forth depending on where they are in their release cycle (whichever one currently has the cool new toys, basically), but I don’t think there’s a lot in it overall. They do tend to have somewhat different ergonomics, though. I had a strong preference for Nikons when I handled them side by side, and I’ve heard other people who had exactly the opposite reaction.

    I think the ergonomics are the main difference. I went the Canon route, because my big foray back into photography was a Canon Pro-1 (at the time it was a Rebel without interchangeable lenses) and when I was ready for a ‘real’ camera I was already comfortable with holding the Canons, and familiar with the layout.

    clouddancer the fun is going to start with the lenses. On the Canon side, the EF and EF-S lenses are fairly different in a few significant ways. On a Rebel, or the xxD series (like my 40D) the focal distance of an EF lens is not the same as an EF-S, because of the sensor size of the camera, and the distance from the back of the lens to the sensor IIRC, it’s something like 1.6x the number on the lens, so for example my 50mm behaves like an 85mm from the camera’s point of view. Not a bad thing, necessarily, but it needs to be compensated for especially if you’re looking at taking wider angle shots. Also, if you ever move up to a ‘full-size’ camera like the Mk-series, the EF-S lenses won’t be compatible. Again, probably not a big deal, ’cause I assume you’re like me and will never have one without winning the lottery. I’m assuming the same applies to the Nikon AF vs AF-S lenses but that’s not my bailiwick.

    #23273
    Killerclaw
    Participant

    On the Nikon side of the house, the D40 and D60 will only work with AF-S lenses (in auto focus, you can still manual focus the AF, G or D lenses fine). If you come across an old(er) AF, G or D lens on the cheap, it will auto focus with a D50 (out of production, can be found cheap in some online sources) or with a D90 ($$$).

    There’s also the D5000, which I haven’t used or spoken with anyone who has, but appears to be a D90 sensor and processor in the smaller body/frame, which means it also will be manual only on non AF-S lenses. But it’s $250 cheaper than the 90.

    Nuts and bolts:
    AF-S and AF-I lenses have a motor inside them. Tradeoffs: heavier, quieter, costlier, cheaper camera bodies
    AF, D, and G lenses have a screw-type autofocus and require the camera body to have a motor. Ergo, exact opposite of above.

    Some nikons support both types (D50, 90, and most higher-end ones) but tend to cost more and have a larger, heavier frame
    The cheaper/smaller nikons do not have the internal motor (D40, 60, etc) but use their size/weight as a selling point, and come with the recomendation of only using the AF-S lenses.

    /Biased
    //I heart my nikons
    ///careful, it becomes a cult, then you start to look at canon users in a distrusting manner.
    ////Besides, it’s not like U-Man or Elsinore ever took any decent photos with their canons
    ///// ;-P~ Slashies!

    Canon FTW

    #23274
    sleeping
    Participant

    Canon FTW

    Hey, at least you can still mount and use older lenses. Try sticking an FD mount lens on your shiny new Canon and see what happens. 😉

    #23275
    clouddancer
    Participant

    While we were out and about today, I took the opportunity to look at some cameras that were on display. It gave me a rough idea of what to expect. Nothing like handling them, that’s for sure. I’m actually pretty split between the two, but Hubby said the Canon one seemed to fit better in my hands. I have small hands. Honestly though, I didn’t see any accessories or anything for these cameras, no lenses or anything, and if I’m going to get a new camera that I can put lenses on, I want to buy some lenses with it and filters, not just the body. I’ll do some extra digging and see if there isn’t an actual camera shop somewhere within, oh I dunno, 1000 miles of the place, though I’m doubt it since I live in the middle of nowhere (and I could go on).

    On the plus side, I did get a tripod! I’ve never really used one before. Should be fun. Actually purchasing the camera will be a while though, lack of funds and all that. In the meantime, I’m keeping a camera shots journal of the settings I’m using and all that, so I can associate the shots I’m seeing with the settings and hopefully end up with more consistent and better results overall. I suppose the next thing would be a better camera bag so I can have the tripod in there, the notebook, the camera, extra batteries, etc. Oh, and the portable photo studio I plan on getting from ThinkGeek. This hobby is getting bulky…..

    #23276
    olavf
    Participant

    Quite honestly price-wise you’re going to get a better deal online. I’d stick with a reputable place like B&H Photo or Adorama Camera though, especially if you’re considering ‘gently used’ glass. I’ve also gotten some good deals through Amazon (which is where I found Adorama in the first place). Make sure you read all the reviews, and I wouldn’t be afraid to ask specifics here since someone on the forums has probably used what ever lens(es) you’re looking at for either system.

    For camera bags, personally I ended up with a backpack designed for the purpose. It’s got foam thingys like an over the shoulder bag, plus lots more space (and pockets). Tripod straps to the bottom, and away I go. Another nice thing about a backpack is that I don’t think it tends to get in the way quite so much when you’re walking around and shooting.

    #23277
    Killerclaw
    Participant

    Canon FTW

    Hey, at least you can still mount and use older lenses. Try sticking an FD mount lens on your shiny new Canon and see what happens. 😉

    I can mount FD with an adaptor =)

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